2012-12-05 / For The Record

Best of 2012 – Employees and Volunteers of the Year

Waynesboro Police Department


OFFICER Lillie Wilkerson is presented Waynesboro’s Police Officer of the Year award by Deputy Chief Lodge. Chief Williams said he chose Officer Wilkerson because of her persistence in pursuing her lifelong dream. After two failed attempts to complete the police academy due to poor shooting skills, Officer Wilkerson dedicated herself to firearm training and passed her third attempt. She is now one of the department’s top shooters. “I am a certified firearm instructor, and she can outshoot me,” the chief said, explaining how Wilkerson’s determination serves as an example not only to Burke County’s youth but to everyone who has failed and considered giving up. OFFICER Lillie Wilkerson is presented Waynesboro’s Police Officer of the Year award by Deputy Chief Lodge. Chief Williams said he chose Officer Wilkerson because of her persistence in pursuing her lifelong dream. After two failed attempts to complete the police academy due to poor shooting skills, Officer Wilkerson dedicated herself to firearm training and passed her third attempt. She is now one of the department’s top shooters. “I am a certified firearm instructor, and she can outshoot me,” the chief said, explaining how Wilkerson’s determination serves as an example not only to Burke County’s youth but to everyone who has failed and considered giving up. Police Chief Alfonzo Williams and Deputy Chief Roosevelt Lodge honored seven employees and volunteers whose contributions made a difference in 2012.



CITIZENS ON PATROL Volunteers Rob Shoop, Brian Fort and Jay Broseghini logged more than 1,200 volunteer hours as Citizens on Patrol. Acting as “eyes and ears” for officers, the trio patrols Waynesboro neighborhoods and businesses and calls in suspicious activities to police. According to Chief Williams, second from right, their efforts have led to a number of arrests, including one burglary in progress. CITIZENS ON PATROL Volunteers Rob Shoop, Brian Fort and Jay Broseghini logged more than 1,200 volunteer hours as Citizens on Patrol. Acting as “eyes and ears” for officers, the trio patrols Waynesboro neighborhoods and businesses and calls in suspicious activities to police. According to Chief Williams, second from right, their efforts have led to a number of arrests, including one burglary in progress.

MECHANIC Jeff Anderson was recognized for his work in keeping the police fleet running smoothly. The chief said Anderson’s attention to detail and strong work ethic have saved the agency countless dollars since he was hired earlier this year. MECHANIC Jeff Anderson was recognized for his work in keeping the police fleet running smoothly. The chief said Anderson’s attention to detail and strong work ethic have saved the agency countless dollars since he was hired earlier this year.

RESERVE OFFICER Reserve Officer Thomas Reid donated more than 500 hours of his time this year, working every Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight. He has issued more than 260 citations on road patrol and brought in more than $25,000 in revenue. A Savannah River Site employee by day, Officer Reid also volunteers with traffic control and security for a number of community events including parades, Exchange Club Fair and Relay for Life. RESERVE OFFICER Reserve Officer Thomas Reid donated more than 500 hours of his time this year, working every Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight. He has issued more than 260 citations on road patrol and brought in more than $25,000 in revenue. A Savannah River Site employee by day, Officer Reid also volunteers with traffic control and security for a number of community events including parades, Exchange Club Fair and Relay for Life.

CIVILIAN EMPLOYEE Communications Officer Cindy Crocker was honored as the terminal agency coordinator and for her work in keeping WPD in compliance with the Georgia and National Crime Information Centers. According to Chief Williams, Crocker is the “go to” person when it comes to policy and has worked tirelessly on WPD’s annual report, state certification and efforts to become a State of Georgia Certified Law Enforcement Agency. “I am proud of where she has helped me take this agency,” he said. CIVILIAN EMPLOYEE Communications Officer Cindy Crocker was honored as the terminal agency coordinator and for her work in keeping WPD in compliance with the Georgia and National Crime Information Centers. According to Chief Williams, Crocker is the “go to” person when it comes to policy and has worked tirelessly on WPD’s annual report, state certification and efforts to become a State of Georgia Certified Law Enforcement Agency. “I am proud of where she has helped me take this agency,” he said.

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