2009-06-03 / News

Goodness S-n-a-k-e-s

By Elizabeth Billips lizbillips@yahoo.com

Beaver Sapp demonstrates a toss during a round of Snake Beaver Sapp demonstrates a toss during a round of Snake It's all fun and games for Beaver Sapp.

The just-retired Georgia Power winch truck operator couldn't sit still for more than a week.

So he now spends his days building sets of the outdoor game "Snake" he's grown to love.

He's hoping his private production line will help save the local teen center he also loves.

Beaver, a longtime mentor and coach, has long seen the magic of games when it comes to bringing all ages together. That's part of the reason he started making and donating Snake sets to youth groups after a friend got him hooked four years ago.

The game, which resembles a vertical match of horseshoes, goes by quite a few names like Ladder Golf, Hillbilly Horseshoes and Monkey Balls. But Beaver branded his homemade version Snake for the game pieces' reptilian likeness and ability to wrap around the rungs.

For years, Beaver has been bringing Snake to community events and teaching the young and old how to play. He's also been cranking out the PVC pipe contraptions for local church congregations to use at covered dish dinners and youth events.

MAKE A SNAKE To build each set, Beaver uses 12 PVC elbows, 12 Ts, 26 tubes, four lengths of rope and eight golf balls. For younger children, he substitutes tennis balls. MAKE A SNAKE To build each set, Beaver uses 12 PVC elbows, 12 Ts, 26 tubes, four lengths of rope and eight golf balls. For younger children, he substitutes tennis balls. "Everybody who has tried it has liked it," Beaver says as he underhands a perfect five-point toss. "I play for nearly an hour every day … it calms my nerves."

In between collecting golf balls and PVC pipe for complimentary sets, Beaver is turning out Snake for individuals who want to give it a try.

The only payment he'll accept is a donation to keep Communi- ties in School's Teen Scene open.

With the President's recent slashing of federally-funded abstinence based programs, the center will be forced to shut down later this summer if the community can't back it.

Beaver, a regular volunteer there, says he'll make Snakes day and night to keep that from happening.

"Idle time is nothing but the devil's workshop when it's in the hands of a kid," Beaver says as he tabulates hardware costs for the next dozen designs. "When I go to the center I see kids playing games, socializing in a positive way and learning skills they'll use for life. That's something we can't afford to lose."

GROUND RULES Lattices are placed 40 feet apart. Players take turns tossing two "snakes" each onto one lattice, then the other. Each rung is assigned a number of points. The player who scores 21 first wins the game. But be careful ... if your opponent rings the same rung after you, he takes both of your points. Opponents alternate throwing first. Snake can also be played with teams. GROUND RULES Lattices are placed 40 feet apart. Players take turns tossing two "snakes" each onto one lattice, then the other. Each rung is assigned a number of points. The player who scores 21 first wins the game. But be careful ... if your opponent rings the same rung after you, he takes both of your points. Opponents alternate throwing first. Snake can also be played with teams. GET YOUR OWN Call Beaver at 706-551-1038 and place an order.

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